Hearty Bulgur and Tomato Pilaf with Garbanzo Bean

One of the great inventions of cooks in the Levant is bulgur wheat.  Buglur is made by bar-boiling wheat, which is defined first as boiling the wheat, then drying it.  Bulgur is an ingredient that adds such a great deal do dishes from that part of the world. It gives body, flavor, fiber, protein, iron and many minerals.  Bulgur is also has low glycemic point which makes it good grain for diabetic.

This pilaf provides complete protein because it contains bulgur and garbanzo beans.  Also one serving will give you one fourth of your daily fiber. But the best part that you can feed four people, get all this fiber, protein and nutrient for under $10.00.

 

Hearty Bulgur and Tomato Pilaf with Garbanzo Bean
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Delicious pilaf to serve the family for under $10.00
Author:
Recipe type: Main Dishes
Cuisine: Middle Eastern
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 . medium onion, finely chopped
  • 6 . medium ripe tomatoes, diced or 1 16-ounce can diced tomato with no salt added
  • 2 . tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 . 16-ounce cooked garbanzo beans, drained
  • 2 . cups coarse bulgur #3
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a heavy pot, heat the olive oil and saute the onion for few minutes.
  2. Add the fresh or diced tomatoes with the juice. Cook over medium heat for additional 5 minutes.
  3. Add 2 water, tomato paste and the seasoning, bring to a boil.
  4. Stir in the bulgur and the beans. Bring to a boil. Cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow the pilaf to rest, covered, for 15 minutes. Serve with mixed green salad.

I would love to hear from you when you try this amazing pilaf.

Hearty Bulgur and Tomato Pilaf with Garbanzo Bean

One of the great inventions of cooks in the Levant is bulgur wheat.  Buglur is made by bar-boiling wheat, which is defined first as boiling the wheat, then drying it.  Bulgur is an ingredient that adds such a great deal do dishes from that part of the world. It gives body, flavor, fiber, protein, iron…

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